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Thread: Fireworks & heat

  1. #1

    Default Fireworks & heat

    a concern has been brought to my attenion.
    Is there any safty concerns with 1.4 fireworks and summer heat? they're stored in my shed, w/ ventalation windows but no a/c. should i move them to my attached garage? my concern was inhabited building vs. hot as hell shead (in the 100's). there stored in simi-trailers and sea containers at the wholesaler which get way hotter.
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  2. #2

    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    As you said, they are stored in hot ass containers everywhere. I doubt this is a concern.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    im kinda wondering this myself.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    If it gets over 400 degrees, you should worry. But to qualify as 1.4G, fireworks need to be pretty insensitive to heat. They have to pass tests to be 1.4G rather than 1.3G. I can't imagine that any ordinary shed would heat up enough to matter.
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  5. #5

    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    Summer heat is not a problem with the storage of fireworks. A ventilated shed will be just fine. Ordinary newspaper ignites at a lower temperature than the compounds inside fireworks. I would'nt consider storing fireworks in an attached garage or anywhere else inside a home. In the unlikely event that a fire started from some other source, touched off the fireworks, it could create a real problem in a very short period of time. Then you run into issues with your insurance company.

  6. #6
    Member Array Mike's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    It's not the heat that will damage them, it's the moisture from below. Best and safest choice is your detached shed with fireworks in their original cases (green paper included) and elevated off the ground/floor with something like a pallet, 2x4s, etc. It's not really necessary to wrap them up in plastic or cover with a tarp. They do need to breathe but who has a shed that's air tight anyway. I know mine's not.

    Down here and farther south, we don't really have any issues with them getting too hot. Just keep them dry is all you really need to worry about. Elevation off the ground will take care of that. They WILL soak up moisture from below if you allow them to.
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    Member Array tuffysaq's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    if heat is not a major consern....
    how much humidity can they handle and for how long in the packing.
    im in a verry humid aera should i add a dehumidifer to my storage shed and what is the best method?
    bigg bodda boom!!!!!!!!

  8. #8

    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    Humidity is not a problem either. Here in Missouri, the big distributor's store most of the goods in old truck trailers and big warehouse sheds that are not climate controlled. The summer humidity runs at 90% plus and the goods are just fine. What you do have to watch out for is running rainwater coming in and soaking the goods, or as others have indicated, wicking up moisture from damp ground under the boxes.

  9. #9
    Member Array tuffysaq's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    thanks for the great news i may have had a problem (for the first time ever) i mite not be able to fire my whole stash way over bought. i have alredy did the shoot plan for the 3,4,5,6 and will work verry nicely then someone brought to my awarness that i did not plan for rain,high wind etc.... cant trust the weather. it would take me a mounth to fire just one days worth of the shows i planed. biggs rocks!!!
    bigg bodda boom!!!!!!!!

  10. #10

    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike View Post
    Best and safest choice is your detached shed with fireworks in their original cases (green paper included) .

    OK.........what, exactly is the green paper and what does it do??

  11. #11

    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    Green paper wicks away moisture. When you open a case, the works are typically covered with green/black paper. Leaving it there is a good idea. (i.e. don't break up your cases to display in your corner until you have to!)

    As for heat, I frequent some big distributors and in north texas -- read 100+ degree heat -- they're stacked floor to ceiling in a warehouse without a/c. The big thing as said before is keeping them away from moisture.

  12. #12
    Have fireworks. Will travel. Array JoeRatman's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    Most cases of fireworks come with this green paper that is wrapped around the fireworks in the case. Or its on the inside walls of the case. The paper adds some moisture resistance for the fireworks. If the case gets soaked or it wicks up moisture from the floor, it is not going to help. Mainly it helps when you are in a humid climate.

    I usually save some of it and I use it to repack left over items.
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  13. #13

    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    It's the "tissue" paper wrapped on the cakes and tubes. helps keep moisture out as well as other unwanted particles

    and now i see this has been answered twice already b4 me lol...sorry

  14. #14

    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    This was one that was worrying me as well. I have mine in an unventilated, well sealed 6x8x10 shed, up near the roof on some racks. This week we have seen some very high temps for the NE so I was definitely worried. Thanks for easing my mind here.

  15. #15
    Member Array nater219's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    Quote Originally Posted by graybeard View Post
    ... I would'nt consider storing fireworks in an attached garage or anywhere else inside a home. In the unlikely event that a fire started from some other source, touched off the fireworks, it could create a real problem in a very short period of time. Then you run into issues with your insurance company.
    It is not just insurance companies you should be concerned with; our department responded to a house fire a recently in which fireworks were stored in the attic. I was driving and running the pump, but my crew inside were pretty scared when the 'works ignited. I'm glad I was outside on this one.

    Props to everyone here who stores their stash away from inhabited buildings.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    Quote Originally Posted by nater219 View Post
    It is not just insurance companies you should be concerned with...
    Added Danger to firefighters is obvious, but a lot of folks here don't realize that insurance companies will attempt to deny or reduce payment for a claim if hazardous materials are involved. They don't seem to have any problem at all with gasoline stored in an attached garage, but fireworks may be an entirely different matter. If you happen to live in an area where fireworks are illegal and they are involved in damage to your property, the insurance company may deny your claim completely, even though the fire started from another source.

  17. #17
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    Default Green paper?

    I tried to search it out but came up empty. Why are all cases lined with the green paper?
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  19. #19
    Have fireworks. Will travel. Array JoeRatman's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    Merged similar topic threads
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  20. #20
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    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    are fireworks considered flammable or combustible?? the more we know about this question the better we can answer

  21. #21

    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    are u being silly bigplaya or is that a legit question? i think they are considered explosives.

    they need a spark to ignite by the way. they aren't going to spontaneously fire off in a locked car at 160 degrees F for example.

    I guess at 451 degrees the paper will start to burn, then all bets are off

    EDIT By the way, i know u already know this, but for the benefit of anyone else reading this...

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    Quote Originally Posted by russell View Post
    are u being silly bigplaya or is that a legit question? i think they are considered explosives.

    they need a spark to ignite by the way. they aren't going to spontaneously fire off in a locked car at 160 degrees F for example.

    I guess at 451 degrees the paper will start to burn, then all bets are off

    EDIT By the way, i know u already know this, but for the benefit of anyone else reading this...
    lol yes just being silly, wanted to see if anyone knew

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Fireworks & heat

    If you must store fireworks inside a house or attached garage, you can purchase ammo cans from army/navy stores. I have a friend who was in the army and he was able to get me a small ammo can for free. I'm using it for small valuables and very important documents in the event of a house fire. Ammo cans are fireproof, waterproof, and very strong. So, small fireworks, such as collectible items (novelties, crackers, etc.) can be placed in them as well. The added bonus is they keep moisture OUT, as they are sealed. Add some dessicant packs so the moisture inside doesn't go into the fireworks.

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